Brexit - The UK and the EU

Pimpernel Smith

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There's been a number of disturbing cases here in the Netherlands. Young women with a bout of depression being assisted to kill themselves and the likes.

At times, there are certain aspects in the national psyche and body politic that I find troublesome. A certain coldness and ice like determination to be blinkered and bureaucratically committed resolutely to the process in an almost Catch 22 way with zero empathy. A bit like the UK's old Jobs Worth's.
 

Rambo

Supporter of Possible Sexual Deviants
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There's been a number of disturbing cases here in the Netherlands. Young women with a bout of depression being assisted to kill themselves and the likes.

At times, there are certain aspects in the national psyche and body politic that I find troublesome. A certain coldness and ice like determination to be blinkered and bureaucratically committed resolutely to the process in an almost Catch 22 way with zero empathy. A bit like the UK's old Jobs Worth's.
is there proof of malicious intent in these stories? don't people have the free will to be able to decide on whether or not the time is right for them?
 

Pimpernel Smith

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5,628
is there proof of malicious intent in these stories? don't people have the free will to be able to decide on whether or not the time is right for them?
Yes and no. People with dementia, for example, might not have a clue what they've just signed onto.


 

formby002

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is there proof of malicious intent in these stories? don't people have the free will to be able to decide on whether or not the time is right for them?
This is most concerning (from Clause 5):

'[... ] In 30 years, the Netherlands has moved from euthanasia of people who are terminally ill, to euthanasia of those who are chronically ill; from euthanasia for physical illness, to euthanasia for mental illness; from euthanasia for mental illness, to euthanasia for psychological distress or mental suffering—and now to euthanasia simply if a person is over the age of 70 and “tired of living.” Dutch euthanasia protocols have also moved from conscious patients providing explicit consent, to unconscious patients unable to provide consent. Denying euthanasia or pas in the Netherlands is now considered a form of discrimination against people with chronic illness, whether the illness be physical or psychological, because those people will be forced to “suffer” longer than those who are terminally ill. Non-voluntary euthanasia is now being justified by appealing to the social duty of citizens and the ethical pillar of beneficence. In the Netherlands, euthanasia has moved from being a measure of last resort to being one of early intervention. Belgium has followed suit 37, and troubling evidence is emerging from Oregon specifically with respect to the protection of people with depression and the objectivity of the process. [...]'

Where does it stop? How robust are the safeguards?

'[...] The United Nations has found that the euthanasia law in the Netherlands is in violation of its Universal Declaration of Human Rights because of the risk it poses to the rights of safety and integrity for every person’s life. The UN has also expressed concern that the system may fail to detect and to prevent situations in which people could be subjected to undue pressure to access or to provide euthanasia and could circumvent the safeguards that are in place. [...]'
 
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