The All-Inclusive Shoe & Boot Thread

fxh

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Ask The Shooman The Shooman But the first question is - do you have any cream polish in that "green" :omg: colour? Thats the thing you'll eventually need. To bring it back up.

Basically its probably either grease/oil or water based. Decide which. One way is to put a pile of talcum powder on it over night and see if it soaks it up a bit.

Get some Saddle Soap or something more refined - stuff for cleaning leather furniture is a better bet than going to a cobbler. Safer. Then wash it out. You'll probably need a big retouch with GREEN cream polish.
 

fxh

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Lost soles: Founders sad as Brunswick shoe store shuts up shop
By Carolyn Webb 18 January 2019 — 12:05am

One of the last of the old shoe shops in Brunswick is closing on Saturday, and the couple who founded it will be away at the beach.
Daughter Giulia Angerosa says her parents Donato, 86, and Lina, 84, who opened Anna Fiori Shoes here in 1966, felt "too emotional" to witness its demise.
"It means the end of an era to them and I think they would have liked it to end on a more successful note," Giulia says.
But she is also proud of their achievements.

Giulia Angerosa at her family's soon to be closed store in Sydney Road, Brunswick. CREDIT:LUIS ASCUI


There were once Anna Fiori shops in Block Arcade and South Yarra, now closed, and customers included pop superstar Taylor Swift. Princess Mary of Denmark commissioned them to make red high-heeled D’Orsay court shoes for her five bridesmaids.

Giulia, who now runs the business, says the Brunswick shop is no longer viable. "There’s no one walking on Sydney Road."

She says the owners of the swish new apartments in the area are buying shoes online, or driving to big shopping centres.

The milk bars, butchers and grocers of 50 years ago are now a laser skin care centre, massage outlets and cafes.

The shoe shop hasn't made money for two years, but there have been good times. In the early 1990s, Anna Fiori had 70 employees, produced more than 20,000 pairs a year and supplied 2000 retailers including Country Road, Myer and David Jones. Today, Anna Fiori produces about 5000 shoes per year, supplies about 12 Melbourne retailers and has just six employees, including Lina, Donato, Giulia and her brother Rick.

In the short term, the family will keep their factory at Thornbury, and showroom, and also sell online. Giulia says rejecting the lure of manufacturing overseas in the late 1990s was "not a very smart business decision".

But it would have ceded too much control to others. Shoemaking is part of her parents’ identities. "If someone’s going to take over, they’d prefer to close it."



Lina, Donato and a young Guilia Angerosa with a customer in the store's heydey.

Growing up poor in San Donato village in southern Italy, her mother Lina wore lace-up work boots, but dreamt of owning a pair of red patent leather shoes. In 1966, 13 years after immigrating to Australia, and having worked in shoe factories, Lina had saved up to open her own shop. Lina had been bullied at work. "She used to say, 'I don’t care if I work night and day, as long as I’m my own boss'," Giulia says. Lina's husband Donato quit his construction job, after an injury, to join her.

They chose the business name Anna Fiori because it sounded good, and fiori means flowers in Italian. The couple cut, sewed, soled and heeled shoes in the back rooms, with the shop at the front. Lina was good at "finishing" and quality control, while Donato was a sales whiz.



The shoes were popular because they were smart casual and could be worn either to work or going out – whether Oxford lace-ups, mid-heels or boots. Giulia says her parents worked 12 hours a day, seven days a week, with two weeks off for Christmas. Lina no longer goes without nice footwear, and today likes "frivolous shoes"; her favourite is a high-heeled sandal you could show off at a party. The company nearly folded 35 years ago when a retailer took stock worth $20,000 without paying for it. A loan from Lina’s brother funded a new range, which Lina and Donato were able to sell to Myer.

"She paid my uncle back and everything was fine."

Giulia said the business had survived 52 years out of "sheer perseverence and stubbornness". "When things are bad, my father always says 'tomorrow the sun will shine'. Mum says, 'this is the house where whoever works, eats'. You equate working with being able to feed yourself."
 
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Pauly Chase

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Sent my pair of Alden beefroll penny loafers back for re-furbishing. Got the package back 3 weeks later with a letter stating "we no longer make this shoe, therefore this service is not available anymore." WTFF!
 
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"There’s no one walking on Sydney Road."

She says the owners of the swish new apartments in the area are buying shoes online, or driving to big shopping centres.

The milk bars, butchers and grocers of 50 years ago are now a laser skin care centre, massage outlets and cafes.
That's a sad tale repeated around the western world. The old high street business model is dead. It cannot compete against the convenience and cost effectiveness of online retailers. Then you have the outlet village phenomenon. The rise of street wear as the de facto to go model of dressing for males and females hasn't helped either.

Sent my pair of Alden beefroll penny loafers back for re-furbishing. Got the package back 3 weeks later with a letter stating "we no longer make this shoe, therefore this service is not available anymore." WTFF!
Surprised at that, what rotters!
 

fxh

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That's a sad tale repeated around the western world. The old high street business model is dead. It cannot compete against the convenience and cost effectiveness of online retailers. Then you have the outlet village phenomenon. The rise of street wear as the de facto to go model of dressing for males and females hasn't helped either.
!
I can’t vouch for their explanation of the downfall. I don’t know of the shop personally. And I suspect it may be more complex than their explanation.

I’m thinking of a local “high street” that a year or so ago had a long serving shoe shop close down and in the local paper blamed online sales and people taking photos then buying online and saying that B&M shoes were dead/impossible. Now a year or so later I count 3 new substantial shoes only shops on the same block. So............
 

Pauly Chase

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That's a sad tale repeated around the western world. The old high street business model is dead. It cannot compete against the convenience and cost effectiveness of online retailers. Then you have the outlet village phenomenon. The rise of street wear as the de facto to go model of dressing for males and females hasn't helped either.



Surprised at that, what rotters!
Me too. Really shocked me. This does not make want to purchase Alden ever again.
 
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I can’t vouch for their explanation of the downfall. I don’t know of the shop personally. And I suspect it may be more complex than their explanation.

I’m thinking of a local “high street” that a year or so ago had a long serving shoe shop close down and in the local paper blamed online sales and people taking photos then buying online and saying that B&M shoes were dead/impossible. Now a year or so later I count 3 new substantial shoes only shops on the same block. So............
Interesting there.
On a completely different forum which I read, that has nothing to do with style, menswear etc, the topic of ‘trainers’ came up and while it’s hardly a representative sample I was amazed at how many people (overwhelming majority) eplied that they only own one pair of shoes for wedding and job interviews and spend the rest of their lives in trainers. They even had a sneering disdain for people (like me!) who wear ‘proper’ shoes. I asked what kind of work these people did and many were in what we once considered ‘white collar’ jobs - office admin, banks, etc but as long as they aren’t ‘client facing’ the standard was polo shirt, jeans and trainers.
What a sad set of slobs we’ve become in the western world eh? A race to the bottom. What’s the next step? Jeans are too stifling so the dress code is sweat pants and the t shirt you slept in last night?
 

walker

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unfortunately, the construction is crap. basically alden is assembling spare parts "made in china" literally wasting the good stuff coming from horween and then they go for the artificial laquered finishing, which puts the quality level down. alden is highly overpaid "baukastensystem", not a shoe company anymore. ymmv.

if you really like this style, better go vintage, imo.

Their Saddle Oxford is still a design classic and pre-WWII collegiate favourite. Not to mention one robust American shoe.
 

Rambo

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unfortunately, the construction is crap. basically alden is assembling spare parts "made in china" literally wasting the good stuff coming from horween and then they go for the artificial laquered finishing, which puts the quality level down. alden is highly overpaid "baukastensystem", not a shoe company anymore. ymmv.

if you really like this style, better go vintage, imo.
I didnt know they had outsourced all their materials to china now. Are they still doing construction in the US?
 
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